Press Information

Nobel Prize 2016

Taunusstein, October 13th, 2016:

Scienta Omicron congratulates the Nobel laureates in Physics 2016: David J. Thouless University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA F. Duncan M. Haldane Princeton University, NJ, USA J. Michael Kosterlitz Brown University, Providence, RI, USA

The Nobel Prize was awarded "for theoretical discoveries of topological phase transitions and topological phases of matter".

A topological insulator is a material that behaves as an insulator in its bulk but whose 2D surface contains conducting states. These exotic materials can potentially be used in device applications such as spintronics and quantum computing.

The field of "Topological insulators" is one of the hottest topics in condensed-matter physics today, and Angle Resolved Photoelectron Spectroscopy (ARPES) is a key technique in the investigations. In fact, when discovering the first topological insulator, Bi1-xSbx, Scienta Omicron ARPES analysers were used to probe the surface bands of the material (Hsieh et al. Nature 452(2009)06843).

ARPES is the critical tool to prove a material being a topological insulator or semimetal. Scienta Omicron pioneered the ARPES technique in 1994 with invention of the 2D detector and today continues to revolutionize ARPES with the patented DA30 spectrometer. Since the discovery of Bi1-xSbx several more topological insulators have been studied with ARPES. For a review see for example M. Z. Hasan and C. L. Kane. https://arxiv.org/abs/1002.3895v1.

ARPES maps the electron density as a function of energy and emission angle. Here, the use of the deflection mode in DA30 is very useful. An example measurement on a topological insulator is presented in Figure 1.

Scienta Omicron congratulates the Nobel laureates and is honoured to contribute to the exploration of these novel materials. For more information, please visit our website www.scientaomicron.com for links to ARPES publications, product information and application notes.

Link to Press Information

First winners of China science award announced

Scienta Omicron customer Professor Xue Qikun, 53, a PhD from Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, has been awarded for his pioneering contribution in the quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) effect, a discovery that has helped accelerate the IT revolution and in developing low-power-consumption electronics. An award ceremony is planned to be held in Beijing in January where the winners will be awarded $1 million each.

Article China Daily

Strategic Partnership between Scienta Omicron and CryoVac - Jointly Working on the New Scienta Omicron 
TESLA JT SPM Scanning Probe Microscope

Taunusstein, Sept. 1st, 2016

Scienta Omicron - the leading innovator in Surface Science - and CryoVac have signed a joint R&D and supply contract which gives Scienta Omicron access to CryoVac's proprietary Joule-Thompson cooling and dry magnet technology for commercial UHV Scanning Probe Microscopy.

Link to Press Release

Prime Minister hails UNSW's quantum computing research as the world's best

22 APR 2016

There is no bolder idea than quantum computing, said Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull, hailing UNSW's research in the transformative technology as the "best work in the world". Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull, accompanied by the Minister for Industry, Innovation and Science, Christopher Pyne, today opened a new quantum computing laboratory complex at UNSW in Sydney. "There is no bolder idea than quantum computing," said Prime Minister Turnbull, hailing UNSW's research in the transformative technology as the "best work in the world". He praised the leadership of Scientia Professor Michelle Simmons, director of the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology (CQC2T) and congratulated the centre's team on their research breakthroughs. "You're not just doing great work, Michelle, you're doing the best work in the world. "You're not just solving the computing challenges and determining the direction of computing for Australia, you are leading the world and it is a tribute to your leadership, your talent ... that you've attracted so many outstanding scientists and engineers from around the world," Mr Turnbull said. "This is a very global team and it's right here at the University of New South Wales."

UNSW are leading the world in quantum computing. It's not just a great position to be in, it's a superposition!

Malcolm Turnbull, Prime Minister Australia

Link to full article


Links to further articels:

http://www.smh.com.au/federal-politics/federal-election-2016/malcolm-turnbull-opens-new-quantum-computing-labs-at-unsw-20160422-gocnno.html

http://www.zdnet.com/article/turnbull-opens-unsw-quantum-computing-lab-in-sydney/

https://www.veooz.com/news/nKma7IY.html

"Le Monde": La course des plus petits bolides du monde

"Le Monde", 15. April 2016: A la fin de l'année aura lieu en France la NanoCar Race, course automobile d'un genre très particulier puisque s'y affronteront des équipes de chercheurs de nombreux pays, pilotant la plus petits bolides du monde : des voitures nanométriques. Plongée, avec cette vidéo de CNRS Le Journal, dans l'entraînement de ces scientifiques, à Toulouse.

En savoir plus sur http://www.lemonde.fr/physique/video/2016/04/15/la-course-des-plus-petits-bolides-du-monde_4902861_1650706.html#15W0YjjBPhCM0l6u.99

Link to "Le Monde"

Link to CNRS News (english version)

Link to Popularmechanics

Link to Dailymail

Link to ZEITonline

Scienta Omicron and Zyvex Labs announce a collaboration

Scienta Omicron and Zyvex Labs announce a collaboration to develop and distribute tools for research and manufacturing that require atomic precision. The ZyVector STM Control System from Zyvex Labs turns a Scienta Omicron STM into an atomically-precise scanned-probe lithography tool, and will be distributed world-wide by ScientaOmicron. Scienta Omicron brings together the two leading innovators in Surface Science – the former VG Scienta and Omicron NanoTechnology. This exciting new company creates new capabilities for the research community by combining the technology leaders in electron spectroscopy, scanning probe microscopy and thin film deposition. These capabilities are available in custom tailored systems from one source with sales and service groups located in all major markets around the world. Zyvex LLC pursues the vision to develop Atomically Precise Manufacturing (APM).Recently, Zyvex Labs has developed ZyVector for automated STM Lithography to enable users to create quantum computers and other transformational systems that require atomic precision. By pairing it with Scienta Omicron STMs, unmatched lithography will be possible, with much higher reproducibility and throughput, scaling up from research level patterning towards APM. See more at www.zyvexlabs.com

Capabilities ZyVector automates the process of performing Hydrogen Depassivation Lithography (HDL), using an STM tip to remove H atoms from a surface. It can write arbitrary patterns defined in a vector or a bitmap format. Patterns can be written using a lithography pixel defined by the atomic lattice. As well as developing ZyVector as a tool for atomically precise patterning on small scale, researchers at Zyvex Labs are leveraging its capabilities to create nano-functional devices on the micrometer scale. ZyVector therefore opens up new possibilities to scale up SPM based lithography by setting new standards in reproducibility, automation, thermal drift and piezo creep compensation.

NanoESCA system from ScientaOmicron sold to Bristol University

Bristol, 23 October 2015

Scienta Omicron GmbH, marketleader in scientific UHV instrumentation, and Bristol University, ranked within the top 40 worlds best universities, signed a contract for a state of the art NanoESCA system.

The NanoESCA facility will be installed in the University of Bristol's Centre for Nanoscience and Quantum Information in a dedicated ultra-quiet laboratory in 2016. It will give users access to the UK's first nano-PEEM instrument and the ability to perform cutting edge research on materials using ultra-violet, X-ray and tuneable light sources.
The NanoESCA is an Ultra High Vacuum (UHV) Photo Electron Emission Microscopy (PEEM) system with state-of-the-art resolution for real-space and momentum-space imaging and spectroscopy. It will enable the electronic properties and chemical composition of thin layers of materials to be revealed and quantified by a non-destructive technique.
Scienta Omicron is proud to cooperate on this project with Bristol university underpinning the ambition for top research and instrumentation.

Claes Parflo, Vice President Sales from ScientaOmicron GmbH in Taunusstein stated: "The NanoESCA system with its world record imaging XPS resolution sets the benchmark for lateral resolution in laboratory XPS, ideal for the use at Bristol University."

NanoESCA Project PI, Dr Neil Fox, said, "We are delighted that the contract for the Bristol NanoESCA has been signed today. The NanoESCA will allow Bristol to establish a national resource that will enable the pace of cutting edge material science and discovery to be accelerated using a unique analytical instrument, in one of world's quietest (ultra-low vibration) laboratories".

Prof. Michelle Simmons has won prestigious Australian Prize

UNSW scientists working on quantum computing, marine science and threatened ecosystems have won three prestigious Australian Museum Eureka Prizes – for leadership, science communication, and environmental research.

UNSW scientists have won three prestigious Australian Museum Eureka Prizes – for leadership, science communication, and environmental research.

Scientia Professor Michelle Simmons, Director of the ARC Centre of Excellence for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology, was awarded the CSIRO Eureka Prize for Leadership in Science “for her leadership, passion, commitment and energy devoted to advancing the field of quantum computing in Australia”.

As head of a multidisciplinary, cross-institutional team of 180 researchers, Professor Simmons has helped position Australia at the forefront of an international race to build a large-scale quantum computer based in silicon.

She has developed the world’s smallest transistor, built of one single atom, as well as the world’s narrowest conducting wires in silicon. Among her many accolades, Professor Simmons, of the School of Physics, was named NSW Scientist of the Year in 2012 and was awarded an Australian Research Council Laureate Fellowship in 2013.

Last year, she joined the likes of Stephen Hawking and Albert Einstein as an elected member of the American Academy of Arts and Science. She was made the inaugural editor-in- chief of the first Nature Partner Journal based in Australia, npj Quantum Information, and also helped secure a $5 million investment in quantum computing from the Commonwealth Bank of Australia.

Executive Director and CEO of the Australian Museum, Kim McKay AO, congratulated Professor Simmons and her team for “ensuring Australia’s success in what will become a multi-billion dollar industry”.

The Eureka Prizes, dubbed the Oscars of Science, were presented at a gala dinner in the Sydney Town Hall last night.

Professor Emma Johnston, of the School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, was awarded the Department of Industry and Science Eureka Prize for Promoting Understanding of Australian Science Research “for her work in educating the public on Australian marine science”.

Professor Johnston is a leading authority in marine ecology and inaugural Director of the Sydney Harbour Research Program at the Sydney Institute of Marine Science.

She has used a variety of outreach approaches, from grass-roots community activities including the Run Off and Reach Out program on storm-water pollution, to regular appearances on TV and radio and in print, to ensure policy makers and the public understand the effects of their actions on the marine environment.

As a co-presenter on the successful BBC/Foxtel History series Coast Australia she has helped take Australian marine science to an international audience.

Her numerous awards include the 2012 NSW Science and Engineering Award for Excellence in Biological Sciences, and the inaugural 2014 Australian Academy of Science Nancy Millis Medal for Women in Science.

Ms McKay said Professor Johnston is “undoubtedly one of Australia’s leading science communicators. Her collaborative approach to working with public, government and industry is built on her own deep knowledge of marine science.”Professor David Keith and his IUCN Red List of Ecosystems team were awarded the NSW Office of Environment and Heritage Eureka Prize for Environmental Research “for their establishment of a universal standard for assessing ecosystem risks”.

Similar to the influential Red List for the world’s threatened species, it allows environmental threats to different ecosystems to be compared, making it easier to persuade politicians and the public of the need for policy change.

Professor Keith is a biologist in the School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Science and the NSW Office of Environment and Heritage (OEH). His team includes UNSW’s Professor Richard Kingsford and Dr Nick Murray, as well as OEH’s Dr Tony Auld.

This year the team published the first study implementing the new system, identifying ecosystems at high risk of degradation in Australia, particularly from climate change.

“The Red List of Ecosystems is a powerful tool for scientists and policy makers around the globe,” Ms McKay said.

Congratulations also go to UNSW conjoint lecturer Dr Georgina Holloway, based at the Garvan Institute of Medical Research, and her Monash University colleagues, who won the University of New South Wales Eureka Prize for Scientific Research for their work on stem cells that could be used to cure a range of blood disorders and immune diseases.


Link to the Original article...

Presse Information Scienta Omicron

VG Scienta und Omicron verbinden sich zu Scienta Omicron

Presse Information Scienta Omicron

Press release Scienta Omicron

VG Scienta and Omicron NanoTechnology are merging to Scienta Omicron.

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The Nanosciences group of the FEMTO-ST Institute / France...

This video presents the Nanosciences group of the FEMTO-ST Institute (CNRS, Besançon).

http://youtu.be/8WmCn5xGebs

Professor Michelle Simmons explains quantum computing.

The next big thing in computing is very small. Professor Michelle Simmons explains quantum computing, a field so complex that one pundit says you never fully understand - you just learn to live with it.

YouTube Video

Link to AM from ABC (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

Link to Sydney Morning Herald

Omicron receives order in the USA for research MBE system

Taunusstein and Denver, USA / Nov. 2011.
Omicron NanoTechnology, GmbH, an Oxford Instruments company, which manufacturers molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) systems as well as analytical instruments for materials characterization, has announced the sale of a research MBE system in the USA. Omicron NanoTechnology of Taunusstein, Germany won a competitive competition for a research molecular beam epitaxy system for the growth of arsenide and phosphide based III-V semiconductor alloys at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory.

The system will incorporate several innovative in-situ analysis techniques and is expected to be expanded in the future to include at least one coupled materials analysis chamber.
The firm says that this order confirms it’s growing reputation among the scientific community for developing innovative thin film deposition systems with advanced in-situ analysis techniques. The model EVO-25 III-V MBE will be delivered in 2012.  

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